CAN ZOMBIES HUNT HUMAN BRAINWAVES?


The human brain is an electrochemical organ capable of generating as much as ten watts of electrical power via neural oscillation, commonly known as brainwaves. These brainwaves can actually change depending on what we’re doing and feeling. For example; low beta waves are often associated with quiet concentration, while high beta waves are usually dominate when we experience significant stress, anger, and anxiety… like attempting to hide from zombies!

In fact, researchers have found that beta activity is dramatically increased when movement has to be voluntarily suppressed. Simply resisting the urge to run from the living dead could generate a relatively massive amount of electrical activity (from 14 to 40 Hz almost instantly).

Is it possible that zombies are able to pick up on these neural transmissions; perhaps in some blind attempt to sense any frightened or scared creature hiding in their vicinity? Could the undead develop the cryptochrome in their eyes to sense our circadian rhythms, or provide a heightened sense of magnetoception often found in other animals like bats, deer, and birds:

[Cryptochrome is] … an ancient protein with versions in all branches of life. In most cases, these proteins control daily rhythms. Humans, for example, have two cryptochromes – CRY1 and CRY2 – which help to control our body clocks. But Lauren Foley from the University of Massachusetts Medical School has found that CRY2 can double as a magnetic sensor.

In her research paper, neurobiologist Lauren Foley notes that flies without the cryptochrome gene completely lose the ability to find their next meal. However, when researchers injected these flies with human CRY2, they discovered the flies were able to sense magnetic fields.

Steven Reppert, who the led study, also notes that CRY2 is heavily active in the human retina, claiming that “It’s beautifully poised to sense light but we don’t know if it has the downstream pathways that communicate magnetic information to the brain. The possibility exists.”

The possibility exists that zombies could develop the cryptochrome naturally found in their eyes to sense electromagnetic fields produced by our brains; especially during times of significant stress, anger, and anxiety. This discovery suggests that zombies may not simply be rotting corpses, but rather gain significant advantages as the result of their deadly infection.

For more information please read the original research papers “Human cryptochrome exhibits light-dependent magnetosensitivity” available via Nature Communications, and “Response preparation and inhibition: The role of the cortical sensorimotor beta rhythm” as published by The National Center for Biotechnology Information. Both articles are incredibly informative!

We’d also like to thank Zombie Research Society member Jeremy McCoy for his contribution, which inspired this newly updated article. After all, what you don’t know can eat you!



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